Large Accessory Navicular Bone

Overview

There are three different types of accessory navicular. This extra cartilage, which is turned into bone, is found attached to the posterior tibial tendon, just medial (inside) the navicular bone. The accessory navicular can affect the insertion of the posterior tibial tendon. This tendon has a job of keeping your foot aligned and helping to maintain an arch. The accessory navicular can be associated with a normal foot posture and alignment, or sometime with a flat (pes planus) foot.

Accessory Navicular

Causes

This can result from any of the following. Trauma, as in a foot or ankle sprain. Chronic irritation from shoes or other footwear rubbing against the extra bone. Excessive activity or overuse. Many people with accessory navicular syndrome also have flat feet (fallen arches). Having a flat foot puts more strain on the posterior tibial tendon, which can produce inflammation or irritation of the accessory navicular.

Symptoms

The catalyst for symptoms might be some sort of injury (such as a broken or sprained ankle), excessive activity, or irritation from where shoes are rubbing on the bony prominence the accessory navicular makes. These can irritate the bone, or make the tendon it?s embedded in (the posterior tibial tendon, remember?) inflamed and sore. Because the tendon is compromised in its ability to support the arch, accessory navicular syndrome almost always leads to flat feet, which is one very obvious symptom.

Diagnosis

To diagnose accessory navicular syndrome, the foot and ankle surgeon will ask about symptoms and examine the foot, looking for skin irritation or swelling. The doctor may press on the bony prominence to assess the area for discomfort. Foot structure, muscle strength, joint motion, and the way the patient walks may also be evaluated. X-rays are usually ordered to confirm the diagnosis. If there is ongoing pain or inflammation, an MRI or other advanced imaging tests may be used to further evaluate the condition.

Non Surgical Treatment

Using PRP treatments, orthotics, proper running shoes and physical therapy should do the trick. No long recovery, no long down time. My runners and athletes are usually back to their sport pain free within a month. The key is eliminating the syndrome, not the bone (or cartilage).

Accessory Navicular

Surgical Treatment

If all nonsurgical measures fail and the fragment continues to be painful, surgery may be recommended. The most common procedure used to treat the symptomatic accessory navicular is the Kidner procedure. A small incision is made in the instep of the foot over the accessory navicular. The accessory navicular is then detached from the posterior tibial tendon and removed from the foot. The posterior tibial tendon is reattached to the remaining normal navicular. Following the procedure, the skin incision is closed with stitches, and a bulky bandage and splint are applied to the foot and ankle. You may need to use crutches for several days after surgery. Your stitches will be removed in 10 to 14 days (unless they are the absorbable type, which will not need to be taken out). You should be safe to be released to full activity in about six weeks.

Accessory Navicular Stress Fracture Symptoms

Overview

Sometimes, feet do weird things. For instance, about 10% of the general population?s feet have decided that having an extra bone in the mix is a really great idea. This extra bone (or sometimes a bit of cartilage), is called an accessory navicular. It shows up in a tendon called the posterior tibial tendon (which is a fancy name - but just remember, it helps support the arch of the foot) on the middle of the inside of the foot, just above the arch. This extra little bone is present from birth, so it?s not something that?ll suddenly grow later in life. Now, accessory navicular syndrome is when that extra bone starts causing issues with your shoe-wearing, or even the shape and function of your foot. It?s the syndrome you want to worry about, not necessarily the extra bone itself.

Accessory Navicular Syndrome

Causes

This can result from any of the following. Trauma, as in a foot or ankle sprain. Chronic irritation from shoes or other footwear rubbing against the extra bone. Excessive activity or overuse. Many people with accessory navicular syndrome also have flat feet (fallen arches). Having a flat foot puts more strain on the posterior tibial tendon, which can produce inflammation or irritation of the accessory navicular.

Symptoms

This painful condition is called accessory navicular syndrome. Accessory navicular syndrome (ANS) can cause significant pain in the mid-foot and arch, especially with activity. Redness and swelling may develop over this bony prominence, as well as extreme sensitivity to pressure. Sometimes people may be unable to wear shoes because the area is too sensitive.

Diagnosis

An initial assessment is an orthopaedic office begins with a thorough history and complete physical exam, including an assessment of the posterior tibial tendon and areas of tenderness. Associated misalignments of the ankle and foot should be noted. Finally, weight-bearing x-rays of the foot will help in making the diagnosis. Sometimes, an MRI may be needed to see if the posterior tibial tendon is involved with the symptoms or getting more clarity on the anatomy of the accessory navicular.

Non Surgical Treatment

Many individuals with symptomatic accessory naviculars can be managed successfully without surgery. Standard non-surgical treatment includes shoes that are soft around the inside of the ankle can allow for any excess prominence of bone. Therefore, it is recommended that either shoes with plenty of padding and space in the ankle area are purchased, or pre-owned shoes can be modified by a shoemaker to create extra space in this area. For example, many patients will get their ski boots expanded in the area around the prominence, minimizing irritation. In addition, a shoe with a stiff sole will help disperse force away from the arch of the foot during walking, thereby minimizing the force on the posterior tibial tendon. An off-the-shelf arch support may help decrease the stress applied by the posterior tibial tendon. If necessary, an ankle brace applied to provide more substantial support to the arch may be successful where a simple arch support fails.

Accessory Navicular Syndrome

Surgical Treatment

If conservative measures do not seem to help, however, you may need to have surgery to make adjustments to the bump. This could include reshaping the little bone, repairing damage to the posterior tibial tendon, or even removing the accessory navicular altogether.

Do I Suffer From Accessory Navicular Syndrome

Overview

An accessory navicular is an extra bone that is on the inner center arch of the foot. Up to 2.5% of individuals are born with the accessory navicular. Throughout early childhood, this condition is not noticed. However, in adolescence, when the accessory navicular begins to calcify, the bump on the inner aspect of the arch becomes noticed. For most, it is never symptomatic. However, for some, there is some type of injury, whether a twist, stumble, or fall, that makes the accessory navicular symptomatic.

Accessory Navicular

Causes

An accessory navicular develops as a result of a congenital anomaly and is found more often in women. If the bone is large, it may rub against a shoe, causing pain. Because of its location, the posterior tibial tendon may pull on the bone during walking or running, causing the fibrous tissue that connects the accessory navicular to the navicular to tear and become inflamed.

Symptoms

One obvious problem with the accessory navicular is that it may be large and stick out from the inside of the foot. This can cause it to rub against shoes and so become quite painful. The fibrous connection between the accessory navicular and the navicualar, as well, is easy to injure, also leading to pain. This is kind of like a fracture, and such injuries cause the bone to move around too easily, leading to pain with activity. When the connection between the bones is injured in this way, the two bones do not always heal properly, so pain may continue unabated.

Diagnosis

Plain x-rays are used to determine the size of the accessory navicular. There are three main types of accessory navicular bones: a small bone embedded within the nearby posterior tibial tendon; a triangular shaped bone connected to the navicular by thick cartilage; and a large prominent navicular tuberosity thought to represent an accessory navicular that has fused to the navicular. If the status of the posterior tibial tendon needs to be assessed or if other problems are suspected, (ex. Navicular stress fracture) it may be necessary to perform an MRI. Although this is not considered routine, an MRI may be helpful in identifying the degree of irritation. An MRI would demonstrate fluid or edema that may accumulate in the bone as a result of the irritation.

Non Surgical Treatment

If symptoms have been aggravated by an increase in activity level, backing off on activities in the short term can be helpful. The foot is subject to a lot of repetitive loading during walking, and therefore minimizing this force will often help symptoms to settle. After symptoms have settled, the activity level can then be gradually increased.

Accessory Navicular Syndrome

Surgical Treatment

The above non-surgical options should be enough to treat accessory navicular syndrome. If they fail, a surgery would be necessary to remove the extra bone that has been causing the problems. The most common procedure for this condition is known as the Kidner procedure where a small incision is made over the navicular bone. The accessory navicular is identified and dissected free from the posterior tibial tendon. The posterior tibial tendon is then reattached to the remaining navicular bone.

Type Ii Accessory Navicular Bone

Overview

The accessory navicular also termed the os navicularum or os tibiale externum - is an extra bone or piece of cartilage on the inner side of the foot above the arch that attaches to the posterior tibial tendon within this area. This extra bone, present at birth, is not part of the normal bone structure and found in approximately 10% of the population. Some people with an accessory navicular may be unaware of the condition if symptoms are never experienced. But accessory navicular syndrome is a painful condition caused by aggravating the bone, the posterior tibial tendon or both.Accessory navicular syndrome is an irritation of the accessory navicular and/or posterior tibial tendon. This irritation can be caused by shoe rubbing, trauma, excessive activity, or overuse and can cause problems with the shape and function of your foot. Many people with this disorder also have flat feet which puts more strain on the posterior tibial tendon. Some people are born with an accessory Navicular because during development, the bones of the feet sometimes develop abnormally causing the extra bone to form on the inside of the foot.

Accessory Navicular

Causes

This can result from any of the following. Trauma, as in a foot or ankle sprain. Chronic irritation from shoes or other footwear rubbing against the extra bone. Excessive activity or overuse. Many people with accessory navicular syndrome also have flat feet (fallen arches). Having a flat foot puts more strain on the posterior tibial tendon, which can produce inflammation or irritation of the accessory navicular.

Symptoms

Many people have accessory (?extra?) naviculars (figure 1) - a prominent extra bone extending from the navicular bone. Most accessory naviculars are completely asymptomatic. However, some individuals will develop pain on the inside of their midfoot. Pain may occur from the pressure of the shoe ware against the prominence, irritating either the bone itself or the fibrous junction where the accessory bone meets the regular navicular. Alternatively, the fibrous junction or interface may become painful as a result of tension applied by the posterior tibial tendon through its connection or insertion at that site. Often, individuals will be asymptomatic for years, however, a new pair of shoes or a change in their activity level can cause symptoms. The accessory navicular itself typically develops during adolescence, when the two areas of the navicular bone fail to fuse together.

Diagnosis

Keep in mind there are two different types of accessory navicular bones, which you can distinguish by getting a weightbearing AP X-ray of the foot. Dwight has classified type I as a small, round and discreet accessory bone just proximal to the main navicular bone. Geist described the type II accessory bone, which is closely related to the body of the navicular but separated by an irregular plate of dense fibro-cartilage.

Non Surgical Treatment

Treatment options for a painful accessory navicular can include anti-inflammatory medications, rest, arch support structures in the shoe, or use of a cast or splint. Severe cases may require surgery.

Accessory Navicular

Surgical Treatment

If conservative care does not alleviate the problem then surgical intervention should be considered. The most common procedure for this condition is known as the Kidner procedure where a small incision is made over the navicular bone. The accessory navicular is identified and dissected free from the posterior tibial tendon. The posterior tibial tendon is then reattached to the remaining navicular bone.

How Shoe Lifts Cure Leg Length Discrepancy

There are actually two different kinds of leg length discrepancies, congenital and acquired. Congenital implies you are born with it. One leg is structurally shorter than the other. As a result of developmental phases of aging, the human brain picks up on the step pattern and recognizes some variation. The body typically adapts by dipping one shoulder to the "short" side. A difference of under a quarter inch is not really excessive, doesn't need Shoe Lifts to compensate and mostly does not have a serious effect over a lifetime.

Shoe Lift

Leg length inequality goes mainly undiagnosed on a daily basis, however this problem is easily remedied, and can eliminate numerous cases of back problems.

Treatment for leg length inequality typically consists of Shoe Lifts. Many are very inexpensive, ordinarily priced at less than twenty dollars, compared to a custom orthotic of $200 or maybe more. When the amount of leg length inequality begins to exceed half an inch, a whole sole lift is generally the better choice than a heel lift. This prevents the foot from being unnecessarily stressed in an abnormal position.

Lower back pain is the most widespread health problem afflicting people today. Over 80 million people are afflicted by back pain at some stage in their life. It is a problem which costs businesses millions yearly on account of lost time and productivity. New and improved treatment methods are constantly sought after in the hope of decreasing the economic influence this condition causes.

Leg Length Discrepancy Shoe Lift

Men and women from all corners of the earth suffer the pain of foot ache due to leg length discrepancy. In these situations Shoe Lifts are usually of very useful. The lifts are capable of alleviating any pain in the feet. Shoe Lifts are recommended by numerous skilled orthopaedic doctors.

So as to support the body in a well balanced fashion, your feet have got a vital job to play. Inspite of that, it is often the most overlooked zone in the body. Many people have flat-feet meaning there is unequal force exerted on the feet. This causes other body parts like knees, ankles and backs to be impacted too. Shoe Lifts ensure that ideal posture and balance are restored.
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